Waipi‘o Peninsula Soccer Complex

93-061 Waipi‘o Point Access Road, Waipahu, Hawai‘i 96797

Completed

2000

Awards

  • 2001 American Council of Consulting Engineers Hawai‘i Honor Award

In the late 1990s, with the increasing popularity of soccer as a sport for a spectrum of ages and abilities, the City and County of Honolulu had a vision for a soccer complex that would serve as a local recreational resource to attract national and international teams and organizations. With limited suitable City land available for the envisioned 200 plus acre complex, the City coordinated with the U.S. Navy to develop the then $12.5 million soccer complex on the federally owned land of the Waipi‘o Peninsula, between the West Loch and Middle Loch of Pearl Harbor.

Belt Collins was faced with several challenges at the beginning of this project to build 19 regulation-size soccer fields on the former sugar cane land owned by the U.S. Navy, but met them all and developed a master plan, program requirements, engineering and landscape plans, environmental documents and a lease execution document, in less than 12 months.

Planning services provided included preparation on the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) environmental assessment (EA) for use of federal lands coordinating with the Navy’s COMNAVBASE, PACNAVFACENGCOM, and Naval Magazine, Lualualei commands, as well as with numerous federal, state, and county agencies. A Hawai‘i Revised Statues Chapter 343 Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) was also done for the expenditure of City funds. The EA and EIS evaluated impacts related to traffic, drainage, water quality, public safety (risks associated with the Explosive Safety Quantity Distance [ESQD] arc on the site), stream biota, wetlands, cultural resources, and soil contamination. An environmental baseline survey was conducted along with a Human Health Risk Analysis (HRA) and an Ecological Risk Assessment (ERA), due to past cane cultivation on the peninsula and the proximity of a former solid waste incinerator. Various federal, city and state environmental permit applications were also prepared and processed.

The Waipi‘o Peninsula Soccer Complex opened in 2000 and has expanded to host national competitions and international clubs. The stadium at the 288-acre complex is home field for the University of Hawai‘i Women's Soccer Team. Developed on federal land by the City and County of Honolulu, Belt Collins is proud to have had an integral role in the development of the park, providing planning, environmental consulting, landscape architecture and civil engineering services for this recreational and economic resource serving the community. The complex currently features 23 fields and a 5,000-seat lighted stadium.

The Waipi‘o Peninsula Soccer Complex opened in 2000 and has expanded to host national competitions and international clubs. The stadium at the 288-acre complex is home field for the University of Hawai‘i Women's Soccer Team. Developed on federal land by the City and County of Honolulu, Belt Collins is proud to have had an integral role in the development of the park, providing planning, environmental consulting, landscape architecture and civil engineering services for this recreational and economic resource serving the community. The complex currently features 23 fields and a 5,000-seat lighted stadium.

In the late 1990s, with the increasing popularity of soccer as a sport for a spectrum of ages and abilities, the City and County of Honolulu had a vision for a soccer complex that would serve as a local recreational resource to attract national and international teams and organizations. With limited suitable City land available for the envisioned 200 plus acre complex, the City coordinated with the U.S. Navy to develop the then $12.5 million soccer complex on the federally owned land of the Waipi‘o Peninsula, between the West Loch and Middle Loch of Pearl Harbor.

Belt Collins was faced with several challenges at the beginning of this project to build 19 regulation-size soccer fields on the former sugar cane land owned by the U.S. Navy, but met them all and developed a master plan, program requirements, engineering and landscape plans, environmental documents and a lease execution document, in less than 12 months.

Planning services provided included preparation on the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) environmental assessment (EA) for use of federal lands coordinating with the Navy’s COMNAVBASE, PACNAVFACENGCOM, and Naval Magazine, Lualualei commands, as well as with numerous federal, state, and county agencies. A Hawai‘i Revised Statues Chapter 343 Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) was also done for the expenditure of City funds. The EA and EIS evaluated impacts related to traffic, drainage, water quality, public safety (risks associated with the Explosive Safety Quantity Distance [ESQD] arc on the site), stream biota, wetlands, cultural resources, and soil contamination. An environmental baseline survey was conducted along with a Human Health Risk Analysis (HRA) and an Ecological Risk Assessment (ERA), due to past cane cultivation on the peninsula and the proximity of a former solid waste incinerator. Various federal, city and state environmental permit applications were also prepared and processed.

The complex currently features 23 fields and a 5,000-seat lighted stadium.

Civil engineering design included grading of the site to meet FIAF (Fédération Internationale de Football Association) standards, providing for utility connections including a sewage lift station for the restroom and stadium and 0.6 mile paved access road and a 410-stall parking area.

Landscape planting design focused on field turf and providing shade trees along the parking areas and access road. The stadium was built with imported silica sand-based turf surface with an extensive sub-drainage system to provide a playable field in all conditions. The outer fields were carefully shaped to drain and the tight clay soils were amended with ground tire rubber to improve durability and quality. For the extensive fields/grounds irrigation system, an irrigation lake at the City’s adjacent West Lock Golf Course was expanded to 2.8 acres. The existing filtration system was refurbished, and a new pump station designed for four 1,065 gallon per minute pumps and delivery assembly piping was installed. Over 1.3 miles of 18- to 20-inch diameter irrigation main was designed and installed to serve the complex. 

The complex currently features 23 fields and a 5,000-seat lighted stadium.

Civil engineering design included grading of the site to meet FIAF (Fédération Internationale de Football Association) standards, providing for utility connections including a sewage lift station for the restroom and stadium and 0.6 mile paved access road and a 410-stall parking area.

Landscape planting design focused on field turf and providing shade trees along the parking areas and access road. The stadium was built with imported silica sand-based turf surface with an extensive sub-drainage system to provide a playable field in all conditions. The outer fields were carefully shaped to drain and the tight clay soils were amended with ground tire rubber to improve durability and quality. For the extensive fields/grounds irrigation system, an irrigation lake at the City’s adjacent West Lock Golf Course was expanded to 2.8 acres. The existing filtration system was refurbished, and a new pump station designed for four 1,065 gallon per minute pumps and delivery assembly piping was installed. Over 1.3 miles of 18- to 20-inch diameter irrigation main was designed and installed to serve the complex. 

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