University of Hawai‘i West O‘ahu Allied Health & Administration Building

91-1001 Farrington Highway, Kapolei, Hawai‘i 96707

Completed

2017

Awards

  • 2015 American Institute of Architects, Honolulu Design Awards, Award of Merit (KYA Design Group)

Completed in late 2018 and achieving LEED Gold, the University of Hawai‘i West O‘ahu (UHWO) Administration and Allied Health Building project with its uniquely textured façade stands proud at the front door of the campus, just beyond the main arrival driveway circle. The sculptural landscape features of native and adaptive ground covers and tapering moss-rock walls, greet students and faculty, complimenting the building’s architectural form. A grouping of natural boulders with smooth cut tops for seating, are nestled in the foreground of the building entry. Greywater and stormwater are captured and managed for irrigation reuse and highlighted with discrete educational markers 360 degrees around the building footprint.

The “high level” landscape and site design approach focused on “healing the land”...
The “high level” landscape and site design approach focused on “healing the land”...

Completed in late 2018 and achieving LEED Gold, the University of Hawai‘i West O‘ahu (UHWO) Administration and Allied Health Building project with its uniquely textured façade stands proud at the front door of the campus, just beyond the main arrival driveway circle. The sculptural landscape features of native and adaptive ground covers and tapering moss-rock walls, greet students and faculty, complimenting the building’s architectural form. A grouping of natural boulders with smooth cut tops for seating, are nestled in the foreground of the building entry. Greywater and stormwater are captured and managed for irrigation reuse and highlighted with discrete educational markers 360 degrees around the building footprint.

Belt Collins provided landscape architecture services that included planting and irrigation design coordination with the overall campus master plan and automatic irrigation system. Comprehensive discussions with UHWO key staff and maintenance personnel was conducted for appropriate selection of plant species and for the design and coordination of the sculptural berms with angled moss-rock walls, integrated seating features, site lighting, walkways with decorative pavers, and assistance with stormwater and greywater biofiltration garden systems and reclaimed and stormwater irrigation systems.

The “high level” landscape and site design approach focused on “healing the land” from decades of sugar farming and tilling in the area, depleting the native soil of nutrients drastically altering the natural composition. Native and adaptive plant species were planted with an emphasis on nitrogen fixing species to help rebuild a healthy soil structure.

The sculptural arrival feature is comprised of five angled earthen forms with a rhythm of grassland Savannah style and native ground cover planting integrated with tapering moss-rock walls. The landscape sculpture hides and reveals views, offering a changing perspective while approaching the administration building entry from adjacent pathways enhancing the arrival experience.

The landscape feature also helps direct stormwater away from the building while creating a dynamic composition, complementing the building’s architectural profile. Greywater handling systems and bio-retention gardens by Roth Ecological Design International were incorporated into the irrigation design and highlighted as a University educational component. Concrete pavers with graphic icons, located in the walkways and site walls, indicate the stormwater treatment and greywater garden locations.

The planners prepared the minor modification to the campus’ Plan Review Use Permit.

Belt Collins provided landscape architecture services that included planting and irrigation design coordination with the overall campus master plan and automatic irrigation system. Comprehensive discussions with UHWO key staff and maintenance personnel was conducted for appropriate selection of plant species and for the design and coordination of the sculptural berms with angled moss-rock walls, integrated seating features, site lighting, walkways with decorative pavers, and assistance with stormwater and greywater biofiltration garden systems and reclaimed and stormwater irrigation systems.

The “high level” landscape and site design approach focused on “healing the land” from decades of sugar farming and tilling in the area, depleting the native soil of nutrients drastically altering the natural composition. Native and adaptive plant species were planted with an emphasis on nitrogen fixing species to help rebuild a healthy soil structure.

The sculptural arrival feature is comprised of five angled earthen forms with a rhythm of grassland Savannah style and native ground cover planting integrated with tapering moss-rock walls. The landscape sculpture hides and reveals views, offering a changing perspective while approaching the administration building entry from adjacent pathways enhancing the arrival experience.

The landscape feature also helps direct stormwater away from the building while creating a dynamic composition, complementing the building’s architectural profile. Greywater handling systems and bio-retention gardens by Roth Ecological Design International were incorporated into the irrigation design and highlighted as a University educational component. Concrete pavers with graphic icons, located in the walkways and site walls, indicate the stormwater treatment and greywater garden locations.

The planners prepared the minor modification to the campus’ Plan Review Use Permit.

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