Ane Keohokālole Highway Kailua-Kona, HI

Kailua-Kona, Hawai‘i

Completed

2012

Awards

  • 2014 ACECH Engineering Excellence Awards, Honor Award
  • 2013 Outstanding Civil Engineering Achievement Award-Best Transportation Project, American Society of Civil Engineers Hawai‘i Section

Bus stop

A team of Belt Collins planners, civil engineers, landscape architects, and subconsultants mobilized to complete the entitlement and construction documents for the ARRA 2009 project.  A Context Sensitive Solutions (CSS) approach was used in the planning process to develop the highway corridor. The CSS process was done when Kona was concluding its Community Development Plan process. Through on-site charrettes, a complete street solution was developed that included dedicated bus rapid transit lanes, bike lanes, shared use paths, bio-retention swales, and roundabouts.

Belt Collins worked with the community to identify their transportation needs between Kailua-Kona Town and Keāhole Airport. and to design the initial phases of the project. A Chapter 343 Hawai‘i Revised Statutes and National Environmental Policy Act environmental assessment was prepared, with National Historic Preservation Act Section 106 consultation process conducted on behalf of the Federal Highway Administration. The process was particularly demanding, given the presence of archaeological resources along the proposed alignment, resulting in a Memorandum of Agreement for significant archaeological and historical mitigation. The mitigations included installing interpretive signs along the highway, construction of an interpretive center and preservation of one of Hawai‘i’s last remaining dryland forests. Consultation with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service under Section 7 of the Endangered Species Act, Department of Transportation Act of 1966 Section 4(f) review and a Federal Consistency Assessment in support of the request for Coastal Zone Management consistency review were also completed.

Ane Keohokālole Highway was long planned to be a 4-lane divided primary arterial roadway serving the west side of the island of Hawai‘i. The preliminary engineering report and environmental assessment for the highway were in process when the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) 2009 was enacted to provide funding for “shovel ready” infrastructure projects. It was then that Belt Collins partnered with the County of Hawai‘i to prepare the construction plans and coordinate the project approval process to implement the planned highway improvements, taking a 3 mile segment the highway from preliminary design to approved bid document in 6 months’ time.

This is probably the most satisfying project we’ve built because it was the most challenging, and yet the most successful in terms of bringing people together,” Mayor Kenoi said. “These people did what has never been done before in Hawai‘i County.  In less than a year, they took a dotted line on a map and brought it to the point where construction can begin.
Billy Kenoi, Mayor, County of Hawai‘i
The County of Hawai‘i sincerely appreciates the work performed by Belt Collins Hawaii to make the Ane Keohokālole Highway a reality.
Warren Lee, Director Department of Public Works County of Hawai‘i

Sidewalk marker indicating Keahuolū and Kealakehe ahupua‘a boundaries.

Signage showing proper usage of pedestrian and bicycle path.

The design included widening of 0.30 miles of Palani Road, improvements to four intersections, five new intersections with two for future implementation of roundabouts, guardrails, bike lanes, drainage improvements including bioswales, street lighting, landscaping, 46kV, and other overhead electrical and telephone system relocation, and new underground electrical and communications duct systems. Construction phasing and traffic management plans were developed, and National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System and Underground Injection Construction permitting services for construction storm water discharges and storm water disposal, respectively, were provided.

The construction documents were done in four construction packages providing the initial two-lane roadway section and mass grading of the entire right-of-way for the future 4-lane divided highway. The $35 million project was successfully bid 2010 and completed in 2012, and recognized as the 2013 Outstanding Civil Engineering Achievement Award - Best Transportation Project by the American Society of Civil Engineers Hawai‘i Section.

Keahuolū and Kealakehe sidewalk markers.

Ane Keohokālole Highway was long planned to be a 4-lane divided primary arterial roadway serving the west side of the island of Hawai‘i. The preliminary engineering report and environmental assessment for the highway were in process when the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) 2009 was enacted to provide funding for “shovel ready” infrastructure projects. It was then that Belt Collins partnered with the County of Hawai‘i to prepare the construction plans and coordinate the project approval process to implement the planned highway improvements, taking a 3 mile segment the highway from preliminary design to approved bid document in 6 months’ time.

This is probably the most satisfying project we’ve built because it was the most challenging, and yet the most successful in terms of bringing people together,” Mayor Kenoi said. “These people did what has never been done before in Hawai‘i County.  In less than a year, they took a dotted line on a map and brought it to the point where construction can begin.
Billy Kenoi, Mayor, County of Hawai‘i
The County of Hawai‘i sincerely appreciates the work performed by Belt Collins Hawaii to make the Ane Keohokālole Highway a reality.
Warren Lee, Director Department of Public Works County of Hawai‘i

Keahuolū and Kealakehe sidewalk markers.

Bus stop

A team of Belt Collins planners, civil engineers, landscape architects, and subconsultants mobilized to complete the entitlement and construction documents for the ARRA 2009 project.  A Context Sensitive Solutions (CSS) approach was used in the planning process to develop the highway corridor. The CSS process was done when Kona was concluding its Community Development Plan process. Through on-site charrettes, a complete street solution was developed that included dedicated bus rapid transit lanes, bike lanes, shared use paths, bio-retention swales, and roundabouts.

Belt Collins worked with the community to identify their transportation needs between Kailua-Kona Town and Keāhole Airport. and to design the initial phases of the project. A Chapter 343 Hawai‘i Revised Statutes and National Environmental Policy Act environmental assessment was prepared, with National Historic Preservation Act Section 106 consultation process conducted on behalf of the Federal Highway Administration. The process was particularly demanding, given the presence of archaeological resources along the proposed alignment, resulting in a Memorandum of Agreement for significant archaeological and historical mitigation. The mitigations included installing interpretive signs along the highway, construction of an interpretive center and preservation of one of Hawai‘i’s last remaining dryland forests. Consultation with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service under Section 7 of the Endangered Species Act, Department of Transportation Act of 1966 Section 4(f) review and a Federal Consistency Assessment in support of the request for Coastal Zone Management consistency review were also completed.

Sidewalk marker indicating Keahuolū and Kealakehe ahupua‘a boundaries.

Signage showing proper usage of pedestrian and bicycle path.

The design included widening of 0.30 miles of Palani Road, improvements to four intersections, five new intersections with two for future implementation of roundabouts, guardrails, bike lanes, drainage improvements including bioswales, street lighting, landscaping, 46kV, and other overhead electrical and telephone system relocation, and new underground electrical and communications duct systems. Construction phasing and traffic management plans were developed, and National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System and Underground Injection Construction permitting services for construction storm water discharges and storm water disposal, respectively, were provided.

The construction documents were done in four construction packages providing the initial two-lane roadway section and mass grading of the entire right-of-way for the future 4-lane divided highway. The $35 million project was successfully bid 2010 and completed in 2012, and recognized as the 2013 Outstanding Civil Engineering Achievement Award - Best Transportation Project by the American Society of Civil Engineers Hawai‘i Section.

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